Arkansas.gov

Kindergarten Readiness Indicator Checklist

Kindergarten Readiness Indicator Checklist

Arkansas's Definition of School Readiness: School ready children have the social and academic knowledge, skills and behaviors for school success and lifelong learning. School readiness occurs when families, schools and communities support and serve ALL children, so they are successful in school and in life.
 
This is a list of skills and knowledge that will help your child be ready for kindergarten. The checklist is NOT a test. It is a tool to help you see all of the things your child can do that will help him or her make the transition to kindergarten.
 
Social and emotional development
Engaging in healthy relationships and interactions with others
(   )  Children show curiosity and are engaged in learning.
(   )  Children work and play well alone. 
(   )  Children express care and concern for others.
(   )  Children cooperate with others.
(   )  Children follow simple rules and routines.  
(   )  Children adapt to new environments with appropriate behaviors and emotions.
(   )  Children identify how they feel with words.
(   )  Children identify how others feel with words.
(   )  Children understand characteristics of self and others.
 
Language development
Using language to talk with others and learn new things
(   )  Children use language to express their needs and ideas.
(   )  Children use a variety of different words in their daily speech.
(   )  Children listen attentively.
(   )  Children speak in complete sentences.
(   )  Children ask questions, such as who, what, where, when, why and how.
(   )  Children communicate personal information.
 
Phonological awareness and print knowledge
Understanding that letters, syllables and sounds, when written, convey a message
(   )  Children recognize print in everyday life.
(   )  Children recognize their first name in print.
(   )  Children identify words that rhyme.
(   )  Children recognize basic characteristics of books.
(   )  Children recognize how books are read.
(   )  Children identify the letters in their name.
(   )  Children name upper- and lower-case letters of the alphabet.
(   )  Children recognize that letters of the alphabet have distinct sounds.
 
Writing
Communicating through drawing, symbols and letters
(   )  Children experiment with writing tools and materials.
(   )  Children use drawing, symbols or letters to express ideas.
(   )  Children copy lines, circles, crosses and other symbols.
(   )  Children begin to write the letters of their name.
 
Cognitive development
Learning through every day experiences
(   )  Children express themselves creatively. 
(   )  Children identify the basic colors.  
(   )  Children match two objects that are the same.
(   )  Children sort and classify objects by groups that go together.
(   )  Children notice similarities and differences.
(   )  Children engage in storytelling with adults and peers.
(   )  Children retell a simple story that has been read to them.
(   )  Children predict what might happen next.
 
Math and science
The use of words and numbers to describe relationships and solving problems
(   )  Children draw conclusions from everyday experiences. 
(   )  Children recognize shapes by name.
(   )  Children count out loud in correct order.
(   )  Children recognize numbers in the everyday environment.
(   )  Children count and tell how many are in a group of objects.
(   )  Children understand simple concepts of measurement. 
(   )  Children don’t give up easily when solving problems.
(   )  Children identify more than one way to solve a problem.
 
Health and physical well-being
Engaging in healthy lifestyle choices and activities that promote motor development
(   )  Children eat a nutritious diet. 
(   )  Children get plenty of rest.
(   )  Children are physically active daily. 
(   )  Children receive all required immunizations and medical exams (physical, dental and vision).
(   )  Children use self-help skills. 
(   )  Children hop, skip, run, jump, climb and do other activities that develop large muscles and provide exercise (with supervision). 
(   )  Children use pencils, crayons, scissors and paints and do other activities that develop small muscles.
 
Adopted by the Arkansas Early Childhood Commission on 4/15/2014
 
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